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Home Company News & Events Press Releases 2017 NIH Awards SBIR Phase I Grant to PharmaSeq for Assembly of Long DNA Fragments in vitro

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NIH Awards SBIR Phase I Grant to PharmaSeq for Assembly of Long DNA Fragments in vitro

Monmouth Junction, NJ, December 1, 2017. PharmaSeq, Inc., announced today the receipt of a Phase I SBIR grant for a project titled "Method for High-Throughput Assembly of Long DNA Fragments in vitro." The grant was awarded by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health.

The grant’s objective is to develop principles and demonstrate the feasibility of a rapid DNA assembly method through a ligation reaction that will increase the length of synthetic double-stranded DNA to 100 kilo base pairs (kb). This, in turn, will facilitate the ability to more rapidly create artificial genes and chromosomes, and thus the method will become an important tool in synthetic biology. The proposed approach involves ligations of short, 10 kb DNA fragments (“building blocks”) into longer, approximately 100 kb DNAs, which are then transferred into cells.

The work being funding includes development of both hardware and software, including a custom instrument and specialized reaction vessels for conducting the ligation reactions. Ligation efficiency will be monitored using fluorescence measurements and biologically, and the integrity of the final products will be confirmed. The large assembled DNA fragments can be used in gene cloning and expression experiments to create novel biological products in different organisms. 

“The purpose of this project is to design a new generation of scientific instruments and related methods for synthetic biology,” states Wlodek Mandecki, Ph.D., President and Chief Scientific Officer of PharmaSeq. Dr. Mandecki adds, “Such major advancements in synthetic genomics will have wide applicability in improved crop production, alternative energy, animal husbandry, drug discovery and other areas, such as deciphering human noncoding DNA variants. It is anticipated that the methods being created will be adopted worldwide by a wide range of scientists in academia, government and private industries.”

Some of the work will be performed in collaboration with Dr. Jef D. Boeke and his colleagues in the Institute for Systems Genetics at the NYU School of Medicine in New York City. This group is recognized worldwide for de novo synthesis of several yeast chromosomes.

For further information, please contact Richard G. Morris, Ph.D., CEO, or Dr. Mandecki at (732) 355-0100 ext. 11.


PharmaSeq, Inc.
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Monmouth Junction, NJ 08852


Find us on the web at: www.pharmaseq.com.


Home Company News & Events Press Releases 2017 NIH Awards SBIR Phase I Grant to PharmaSeq for Assembly of Long DNA Fragments in vitro